Saturday, April 23, 2011

It's Sneak Peak Time...For Risepetto

And there are four of them. Bet I can guess which one everyone likes BEST!









And after watching these, I am left with a glimmer of hope that Goren & Eames are truly back. I saw a glimpse of the "old" Bobby, and that made me smile. (Thank you Spoiler TV.)

Friday, April 22, 2011

Hope...Springs Eternal?

Another article. This one by Matt Webb Mitovich for TV/Line.

Dick Wolf Hopes For Criminal Intent Reprieve, Says D'Onofrio & Erbe Have Never Been Better

Dick Wolf must be feeling a bit of deja vu this spring. Just as a year ago he was lobbying for NBC to pick up the original Law & Order for a 21st season (allowing it to set a record as TV’s longest-running drama series), the L&Overlord is now hoping that Criminal Intent‘s imminent 10th season won’t be — as announced by USA Network — its last.

“Being the unbridled optimist that I am, I still have hope that this is a ‘victory lap’ and not a ‘swan song,’” Wolf said during a Thursday conference call. “Based on the work so far, I think the audience is going to be very happy, relieved, and welcoming… and hopefully enough fans will come out so the powers-that-be reconsider their decision.”

Weighing in Criminal Intent‘s favor, of course, is the much anticipated return of two original series leads, Vincent D’Onofrio and Kathryn Erbe (as Detectives Robert Goren and Alexandra Eames) — not that Wolf ever wanted them long gone in the first place.

“It was never a decision to have them disappear into the wilderness,” Wolf says of the duo’s single-season extraction, during which Jeff Goldblum rode solo as Detective Zach Nichols. Looking forward, Wolf says, “I don’t think Vincent and Katie have been any better ever in the series. [Criminal Intent] is back to the power of the first two seasons.”

Criminal Intent Lines Up Guest Stars for Final Season

Of course, there is the none-too-small matter of getting Goren back onto the Major Cases Squad, fired as he was for insubordination at the start of Season 9. That segue is orchestrated by a new captain, Joseph Hannah (played by Jay O. Sanders), whom Goren knows from the police academy.

There’s also a bit of head-shrinking involved in Goren’s comeback. As Wolf explains, “In getting him back in the good graces of the police department, part of the agreement was for him to go back into psychological counseling.” As such, there will be one scene per episode where Goren meets with a therapist played by Julia Ormond (CSI: NY).

Those scenes, Wolf says, “will answer some questions that have been hanging since the first season, and over the course of [Season 10's] eight episodes you’re going to see something about the redemptive power of psychotherapy. This is an attempt to move [Goren] back to the psychologically complete detective that he was in the first season of the show.”

Whether this run of episodes kicking off Sunday, May 1, at 8/7c, is a “swan song” or “victory lap,” Wolf says, “This has been a great experience…. There is a real power in seeing this show come back at full-octane, with stories that are really interesting.”

Thursday, April 21, 2011

The Thing I Liked Most About This Article...

...is that I could hear VDO's voice in my head the whole time, so it was "almost" like he was reading it to me.


Actor Vincent D'Onofrio is seen outside the set of his television show "Law and Order: Criminal Intent" at Chelsea Piers in Manhattan, NY. (Jennifer S. Altman, For The Times / April 24, 2011)

By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
April 24, 2011

After a year and a half absence, Vincent D'Onofrio, 51, returns to "Law & Order: Criminal Intent" as the brilliant but troubled detective Robert Goren for the show's 10th season, which debuts May 1 on the USA Network.

I like your character, Det. Goren, but he seems to get a mixed reaction. I think some people don't get him.

It's always been like that. I think that's OK. It's not for everybody, especially the way I play him is not to everybody's taste. People, I think, unless they allow themselves to take the leap of faith, they don't like the intelligence, the ridiculous amount of knowledge he has. It doesn't make it easy in a 40-minute show to solve a crime [persuasively] in the first place, but then to have a guy who's as clever as Goren solve it, it kind of makes it even harder to get away with. It's a battle for people to like that show, I think. On the other hand, the people who do take the leap love it. I say that not out of arrogance. Believe me, every time I go to the corner to get milk for the kids, I hear it.

Goren is seeing a shrink this season, right?

Maybe. We haven't shot any of that yet. But the word is that yeah, Goren is seeing a shrink.

Why did you leave the series and why are you back?

I needed to stretch a bit and spend time with my kids and family and my wife. I wrote with a couple of friends of mine and directed a film that's going to be distributed next winter. It's called "Don't Go in the Woods," a pretty crazy movie; it's a slasher musical. I wanted to do things like that, and during the last year and a half, I developed three films. That one was made. We're going to make an announcement about the second one that me and my friends wrote that we're producing.

Tell me about the slasher musical.

Me and two friends — Joe Vinciguerra and Sam Bisbee, who's a musician — I had this idea about a bunch of kids who go into the woods, and they all sing and they all die. It's modeled after a B slasher film, but it's a musical with beautiful music. I cast it off the streets of New York with all unknown actors. The movie cost $100,000, and we shot it in 12 days.

How did you happen to come back?

[Series creator] Dick [Wolf] called me. Dick has been a great supporter of mine since the show began. When I was getting tired, he helped me out then. I don't know why he does it, because he's an amazing businessman, and usually amazing businessmen don't care about what their actors are thinking. But in my case with Dick, it's exactly the opposite. And he has always tried to accommodate me in whatever way he could without of course being ridiculous. I don't want to say anything about the show with Jeff [Goldblum], because I thought I was leaving the show for good and Jeff was going to be the perfect person to play that part. Why the show didn't work out, I have no idea.

How was making the show so intense in 2004 that you ended up being hospitalized for nervous exhaustion, and why won't that be the case now?

It's very simple. We're not doing that amount of shows ever.

How many were you doing then?

Twenty-three. It wasn't just me, by the way. It was Kate [costar Kathryn Erbe] too. Both of us had kids, and we were working 10 months out of the year with maybe a couple of days off here and a couple of days off there. And at one point, I think it was on the second or third season, it was a brutal, brutal time. And I will never ever, no matter what kind of money they offer me, ever do that again.

That's why it's eight episodes?

Yeah, we're doing eight. And my wife told me that USA is really pushing the "last eight" thing, the final-season thing, which I think is really interesting. I know the television business pretty well now. I've been in it for 10 years, and I've never heard of a company saying something is over until it's really over. I always thought that people were in television for the money, companies. And why would they kill something if they could figure out how to make money off it? I think that from an actor's point of view, because I'm certainly not making an official announcement because I have no control over these things, I would say it's probably not done. I would say that "Criminal Intent" will be back in some form after these eight at some point.

From your mouth.... Speaking of God, the first episode of the new season deals with misdoings in the Catholic Church. You were an altar boy, weren't you? How did it feel to work on that episode?

I always found it a bit nerve-racking when we did things that the church was involved in. It's the same when you do things about bad cops. As you know, in this day and age, everybody loves to hear nasty stories about people; tales being told out of school are the most popular thing in the universe right now, on the Internet, on television. And they always have, about the church and they always have about law enforcement officers. I just think you have to be really careful when you tread those waters because on both accounts there's a lot of good that's been done. There are a lot of priests in this country that are more like social workers than guys who have to answer to the pope, and they don't get credit. And the same with cops.

Friday, April 8, 2011

More Vincent, More Bobby

Very nice...dare I say, "amazing," interview. I should have gone to see "Kill The Irishman" last weekend; it is only playing at one theater now, and it's not one that I will go to. I'll have to wait for the DVD or Video On Demand from Amazon. Guess he must have dressed in a hurry; it appears that his ring finger is naked this morning.

And did you hear VDO say that he has a "feeling" that they will do more episodes of LOCI? Granted, he said it is not an "official" statement, but still...

Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

It took me a while, but I finally tracked down the website for these photos; if they were on the USA Network LOCI website, I certainly couldn't find them.

Sunday, April 3, 2011

Bobby's Back...Baby

I suppose we'll see more and more of these promos as the May 1st premier date grows ever closer.

video


Law & Order: CI on USA Network -- back 5/1 at... by USANetwork

Ah, the boys upstairs still think he's crazy. But that's what makes Bobby...well...Bobby, and so completely watchable.

And, for the record, I didn't mind this photo so much. I like the "hint" of a smile around the eyes and borderline "self-satisfied" expression that wants to SHOUT, "I'm back, baby!! I knew you couldn't get along without me!"